Just like the last article, this also focuses on a feature that I would like my portfolio to have. A custom cursor. I’ve noticed this trend a lot lately and I think it adds a bit of extra sass to the website.

In this article, we’ll be making a very basic custom cursor. This could act as a base setup for any kind of cursor you would want to create for your next project. So let’s jump right into the

P.S.: Just React no other dependencies!!

Github Repository: Click me

Live CodeSandBox: Click me

Set up

Run the following command to set up a default react app

npx create-react-app custom-cursor
cd custom-cursor
yarn start

Final File Structure

useMousePosition():

I want to add more cursors to this repository in the future and hence I created a separate hook for getting the current position of the mouse.

Paste this code in src/hooks/useMousePosition.js

import { useEffect, useState } from "react";

export default function useMousePosition() {
  const [mousePosition, setMousePosition] = useState({ x: null, y: null });

  useEffect(() => {
    const mouseMoveHandler = (event) => {
      const { clientX, clientY } = event;
      setMousePosition({ x: clientX, y: clientY });
    };
    document.addEventListener("mousemove", mouseMoveHandler);

    return () => {
      document.removeEventListener("mousemove", mouseMoveHandler);
    };
  }, []);

  return mousePosition;
}

In a nutshell, we are listening to an event called mousemove and calling a function mouseMoveHandler on each mouse movement. The function then updates the state with the new coordinates and then our precious little hook return those new coordinates.

Custom Cursor

Here is a simple Dot and Ring cursor.

Paste this code in src/components/DotRing/DotRing.js and scroll down for an explanation of this code.

import "./DotRing.css";
import useMousePosition from "../../hooks/useMousePosition";

const DotRing = () => {
	// 1.
  const { x, y } = useMousePosition();
  return (
    <>
			{/* 2. */}
      <div
        style={{ left: `${x}px`, top: `${y}px` }}
        className="ring"
      ></div>
			{/* 3. */}
      <div
        className="dot"
        style={{ left: `${x}px`, top: `${y}px` }}
      ></div>
    </>
  );
};

export default DotRing;

Let’s break it down:

  1. We returned {x, y} from useMousePosition() and here we are using them.
  2. This is the outer ring over the dot and we are passing the x and y coordinate to the left and top of this element.
  3. This is the dot and we are doing the same this here, passing left: x and top: y

DotRing.css

.ring {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 22px;
  height: 22px;
  border: 2px solid rgba(31, 30, 30, 0.808);
  border-radius: 100%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  -webkit-transition-duration: 100ms;
  transition-duration: 100ms;
  -webkit-transition-timing-function: ease-out;
  transition-timing-function: ease-out;
  will-change: width, height, transform, border;
  z-index: 999;
  pointer-events: none;
}

.dot {
  position: fixed;
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  width: 8px;
  height: 8px;
  background-color: black;
  border-radius: 100%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  z-index: 999;
  pointer-events: none;
}

One thing to notice here is the transition property, we are delaying the movement of the ring by 100ms. This all is personal preference by the way.

The will-change property:

The will-change CSS property hints to browsers how an element is expected to change. Browsers may set up optimizations before an element is actually changed. These kinds of optimizations can increase the responsiveness of a page by doing potentially expensive work before they are actually required.

Using The Cursor

App.js

import "./App.css";
import DotRing from "./components/DotRing/DotRing";

function App() {
  return (
    <div className="App">
      <DotRing />
      <div className="container"></div>
      <div className="container" style={{ background: "peachpuff" }}></div>
    </div>
  );
}

export default App;

App.css

.container {
  height: 100vh;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
}

a {
  text-decoration: none;
  color: black;
}

index.css

Add this to index.css to make the default cursor vanish!

* {
  cursor: none;
}

We are done with a good-looking cursor but there is one problem here, there is no way to change the way the cursor looks or behaves when it is on a certain element.

We’ll be doing just that in the next section.

Mouse Context

Paste this code in src/context/mouse-context.js

import React, { createContext, useState } from "react";

export const MouseContext = createContext({
  cursorType: "",
  cursorChangeHandler: () => {},
});

const MouseContextProvider = (props) => {
  const [cursorType, setCursorType] = useState("");

  const cursorChangeHandler = (cursorType) => {
    setCursorType(cursorType);
  };

  return (
    <MouseContext.Provider
      value={{
        cursorType: cursorType,
        cursorChangeHandler: cursorChangeHandler,
      }}
    >
      {props.children}
    </MouseContext.Provider>
  );
};

export default MouseContextProvider;

This is a very basic context that stores a string, cursorType , and a function, cursorChangeHandler to change that string.

BTW, if this is your first time tripping over context. Here is a link to my article on Using React Context API Like a Pro

The Big Idea

The thing we are trying to accomplish using this context is to change the cursorType by calling the cursorChangeHandler() on onMouseEnter() and onMouseLeave() events of the required element.

We’ll later pass this cursorType as a className to the cursor and define a class for it in the CSS of our cursor.

Using the Context

index.js

Paste the code in index.js

import React from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";
import "./index.css";
import App from "./App";
import reportWebVitals from "./reportWebVitals";
import MouseContextProvider from "./context/mouse-context";

ReactDOM.render(
  <React.StrictMode>
    <MouseContextProvider>
      <App />
    </MouseContextProvider>
  </React.StrictMode>,
  document.getElementById("root")
);

// If you want to start measuring performance in your app, pass a function
// to log results (for example: reportWebVitals(console.log))
// or send to an analytics endpoint. Learn more: <https://bit.ly/CRA-vitals>
reportWebVitals();

App.js

Pas

import { useContext } from "react";
import "./App.css";
import DotRing from "./components/DotRing/DotRing";
import { MouseContext } from "./context/mouse-context";

function App() {
  const { cursorType, cursorChangeHandler } = useContext(MouseContext);
  return (
    <div className="App">
      <DotRing />
      <div className="container">
        <div
          onMouseEnter={() => cursorChangeHandler("hovered")}
          onMouseLeave={() => cursorChangeHandler("")}
        >
          <h1>Hover over me</h1>
        </div>
      </div>
      <div className="container" style={{ background: "peachpuff" }}></div>
    </div>
  );
}

export default App;

Notice the props onMouseEnter and onMouseLeave . These props are helping us call the cursorChangeHandler function to change the cursorType.

Now, we’ll edit the DotRing.js and DotRing.css file to incorporate the new changes.

DotRing.js

Overwrite the src/components/DotRing/DotRing.js with this code

import React, { useContext } from "react";
import "./DotRing.css";
import useMousePosition from "../../hooks/useMousePosition";
import { MouseContext } from "../../context/mouse-context";

const DotRing = () => {
	// 1.
  const { cursorType, cursorChangeHandler } = useContext(MouseContext);

  const { x, y } = useMousePosition();
  return (
    <>
			{/* 2. */}
      <div
        style={{ left: `${x}px`, top: `${y}px` }}
        className={"ring " + cursorType}
      ></div>
      <div
        className={"dot " + cursorType}
        style={{ left: `${x}px`, top: `${y}px` }}
      ></div>
    </>
  );
};

Let’s break it down

  1. Here, we are extracting the stuff out of our context
  2. And dynamically adding the cursortype to the className

DotRing.css

.ring {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 22px;
  height: 22px;
  border: 2px solid rgba(31, 30, 30, 0.808);
  border-radius: 100%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  -webkit-transition-duration: 100ms;
  transition-duration: 100ms;
  -webkit-transition-timing-function: ease-out;
  transition-timing-function: ease-out;
  will-change: width, height, transform, border;
  z-index: 999;
  pointer-events: none;
}

.dot {
  position: fixed;
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  width: 8px;
  height: 8px;
  background-color: black;
  border-radius: 100%;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  z-index: 999;
  pointer-events: none;
}

.ring.hovered {
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  border-width: 3px;
  border-color: lightgray;
}

.dot.hovered {
  display: none;
}

This should be enough to get you started. You can make it as fancy as you want, maybe use keyframes or framer motion to add an infinite animation on the cursor, add different cursorTypes for different purposes

Github Repository: Click me

Live CodeSandBox: Click me

Thank you for reading

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